Grow your Super

If you can afford it contributing extra to your super is a great way to build your balance and you could save on tax.

Good reasons to add to your super

More money for your future

The sooner you start putting money in, the more you’re likely to have in your final payout.

Potential tax savings

For many, super is a tax-effective way to save for your life after work and if eligible offers opportunities to reduce your tax right now.

Top-ups from the Government

If you qualify you could get a bonus co-contribution of up to $500 from the Government – every year!

What are your options?

Learn more about the different types of contributions and what you need to know before deciding whether to make a contribution.

After-tax contributions

Contribute from your take-home pay

Build your balance and benefit from super’s tax concessions on your investment earnings.

After-tax contributions

Access the Government co-contribution

Make an after-tax contribution and you could receive a helping hand from the Government – every single year!

After-tax contributions

Contribute to your partner’s super

Keep your partner’s super growing and you could receive a tax offset.

Before-tax contributions

Salary sacrifice

If your employer allows it, you can add more to your super from your before-tax pay and it could reduce the income tax you pay.

Before-tax contributions

Claim a tax deduction

Choose to have your after-tax contributions treated as before-tax contributions, and if eligble claim a tax deduction.

After-tax contributions

Downsizer contributions

If you’re aged 65 or over you could be eligible to top up your super with proceeds from selling your family home.

It’s important to keep in mind...

You may need to satisfy eligibility requirements before you can make a contribution or obtain a tax benefit (if applicable). There are rules around when you can access your super, which you should consider before making a contribution. Contribution caps also apply. If you exceed these caps, you may need to pay extra tax. Speak with a financial adviser about whether adding to your super is right for you, or visit the Government’s MoneySmart website or the Australian Taxation Office website for more information

Contribute from your take-home pay

Adding to your super from your take-home pay or personal savings is known as making an after-tax or ‘non-concessional’ contribution. After-tax contributions can be made on a regular or one-off basis. 

Once in your account, earnings on this money will benefit from concessional tax treatment in the super fund. Outside of the super environment your investment earnings are taxed at your marginal tax rate – as high as 47% (including the 2% Medicare levy). Inside super, the fund's tax rate is 15% but the effective rate of tax may be lower than this.

If you make an after-tax contribution you could also be eligible to receive a co-contribution from the Government.

Access the Government co-contribution

In the 2021/2022 financial year, if your income is less than $56,112 and you make an after-tax contribution to your super, you could be eligible to receive a Government co-contribution. This means the Government may match up to a maximum of $500. For every dollar you earn over $41,112 the co-contribution amount decreases until it cuts out at $56,112.

Our contributions calculator can show you how much you could receive.

To be eligible

  • You need to make an eligible personal after-tax contribution to your super that is less than your after-tax (non-concessional) contributions limit
  • You need to have a super balance below the general transfer balance cap at the end of 30 June of the previous financial year (currently $1.7 million)
  • You are aged less than 71 at the end of the 2021/2022 financial year
  • You receive at least 10% of your assessable income from employment or self-employment activities
  • You earn less than the maximum annual assessable income limit imposed by the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) for co-contribution purposes ($56,112 before-tax for 2021/2022)
  • You lodge an income tax return for the financial year in which you make the contribution
  • You did not hold a temporary visa at any time during the financial year in which you make the contribution.

Contribute to your partner’s super

If your super fund allows it, you can make a contribution for your spouse – married, de facto or same sex – to help build their super balance. And if they’re not working or on a low income, you could receive a tax offset.

If you contribute $3,000 or more to your spouse’s super account, and if they earn $37,000 or less, you may be eligible for a tax offset of up to $540 ($3,000 x 18%). The offset reduces as your spouse’s income increases above $37,000 and phases out at $40,000.

Salary sacrifice

If your employer offers it, you could contribute to your super from your income before you pay individual tax on it. This could mean less tax for you because contributions to super are generally taxed at 15%* in the fund, which is lower than the tax many people pay on their income.

Known as salary sacrifice, these contributions are before-tax or ‘concessional’ contributions. Each financial year you can contribute up to $27,500 of before-tax contributions, which also includes super guarantee (SG) and contributions for which you claim a tax deduction.

Keep in mind that since 1 July 2019 if you make or receive before-tax contributions of less than the annual concessional (before-tax) contributions cap, you may be able to carry-forward these unused cap amounts for use in subsequent financial years. You can use caps from up to 5 previous financial years, so you may be able to contribute more than you think.

If you’re already making salary sacrifice contributions to your super, towards the end of the financial year it’s a good idea to check the total of your before-tax contributions for the year to make sure you won’t go over the limit (known as the concessional contributions cap) and to work out how much ‘room’ you have if you want to maximise your contributions for the year. You can check your available concessional contributions cap on ATO online services (accessed via myGov).

Claiming a tax deduction for personal contributions

If you make an after-tax contribution, you may be able to claim a deduction which will reduce your overall tax payable and may result in a tax refund. You’ll need to submit a valid notice to let your super fund know you want to do this before you lodge your tax return for the year you made the contribution or the end of the income year following the year you made your contribution, whichever is earlier. Your super fund will issue you an acknowledgement, reclassify your contribution as a concessional contribution and tax it at 15%*. Your contribution will then count towards your concessional contribution limit.

Downsizer contributions

If you sell your primary residence, you may be able to contribute up to $300,000 into your super from the sale. If you have a partner, you can both make downsizer contributions and together, you could contribute up to $600,000 to super.

Compare your options

Use our calculator to compare the benefits of making before-tax versus after-tax contributions.

Compare contributions

Again, before making any decision about making contributions to your super account, speak with a financial adviser about whether adding to your super is right for you or visit the Government’s MoneySmart website for more information.

How to contribute

Making an after-tax contribution to your super is easy as paying a bill or making a deposit into your bank account – it takes less than a minute or two.

Recent announcements in the 2021 Federal Budget, including removal of the work test and lowering the eligibility age for making downsizer contributions, are not yet law and are not included in the information on this page.

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Paper option

MyGov instructions

Step1: Create a MyGov account, then link the ATO to your account. If you already have a MyGov account, just log in and click through to the ATO Section.

Step2: Go to the ‘Super’ tab.

Step3: Choose the fund you want to transfer your money from (called the ‘transferring fund’), and then fund you want to transfer your money to (called the ‘receiving fund’) from the funds listed.

Step4: Confirm your selection and your funds should move your accounts into one Account within three days.

Go the ATO’s MyGov page >

Combine your super online


It’s quick and easy to get your super together.
Login and click Search & combine, under the Grow my super tab.

Combine my super now

If you haven’t already verified your ID you will be asked to do so before combining your super, so have your driver’s licence ready. Alternatively, complete our rollover form or login to your MyGov account.

Paper option

MyGov instructions

Step1: Create a MyGov account, then link the ATO to your account. If you already have a MyGov account, just log in and click through to the ATO Section.

Step2: Go to the ‘Super’ tab.

Step3: Choose the fund you want to transfer your money from (called the ‘transferring fund’), and then fund you want to transfer your money to (called the ‘receiving fund’) from the funds listed.

Step4: Confirm your selection and your funds should move your accounts into one Account within three days.

Go the ATO’s MyGov page >

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Things you should know

* There are limits on how much you can contribute to super each year. Make sure you check the limits before contributing.